Music in Y2K9

12/23/2009


2009 is the year that indie rock burst from a Brooklyn bubble and expanded into a national scene. Hipsters were transplanted from dive bars to arenas. Mohawks and short bangs became hip along with four new tattoos. Bands like Kings of Leon, MGMT, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and TV On The Radio went from blogger buzz to the covers of Rolling Stone and Spin.

It was another year without Dr. Dre’s Detox, though there was an ample portion of synthesizers in most songs. Auto-tune, I mean hip hop. The new supplement hip hop became a part of our weekly diet with T-Payne’s iPhone acting as the maraschino cherry atop a pop fan base creamed with an overindulgence of auto-tune pop songs. Even indie rock groups tried their luck (Discovery).

Some former superstars regained relevancy (Guns & Roses Chinese Democracy released at the end of 2008), while others tried Relapse, and faded (Emimen). Meanwhile, magazines remained months behind blogs and online zines, further confirming our societies growing reliance on new mediums for discovering music. Bands like Passion Pit, Grizzly Bear, and Dirty Projectors became the next big thing.

At SFCritic our fan base grew, as did our staff. Thanks to our readers and writers, SFCritic is growing into a legitimate source for music appreciation and discovery. In 2010, SFCritic have many hopes and dreams for development, including marketing expansion, redesigned layout, and more contributions. (If you’re interested in getting involved let us know) For everyone who has continued to follow and support us, thank you. Have a wonderful holidays, we’ll resume publishing on January 3rd, 2010! See you in the New Year.